Parental Burnout: Study Confirms It Exists And Here's How Moms And Dads Can Prevent It

By Amanda Moore, Parent Herald May 04, 04:00 am
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Moms and dads experience parental burnout and its effects can lead to physical and emotional health problems. PICTURED: An unidentified mom cries as she listens to a statement.
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It turns out exhaustion from parenting does exist. A new study reveals moms and dads suffer from a parental burnout just like career people suffer when they're overworked. How can parents prevent this from happening?

Experts from Belgium's Université Catholique de Louvain conducted a survey of 2,000 parents to validate their theories on parental burnout. The Frontiers in Psychology journal published the research's findings.

Parental burnout is not a new concept as other experts first studied this in the '80s. The Belgian experts, however, were able to qualify and detail their research on which parent is more vulnerable and what are the triggers.

Some of the factors experts determined that could lead to a parental burnout include lack of support from partners or family members, caring for too many children, caring for a special needs child and balancing work and home life, as per Stuff New Zealand. Experts also underscored that while their study had more women respondents, who were the primary caregivers of the kids, the fathers revealed experiencing parental burnout as well.

Parental burnout translates to different issues in moms and dads. It can trigger physical problems, as well as emotional problems like depression or anxiety.

In fact, some of the parents in the survey admitted they found no positive influence in having kids due to being exhausted all the time. Some also said they became less caring for their children.

Parents, however, hold the key to prevent a parental burnout. For instance, couples can plan a holiday together without the kids. "To manage burn-out we need to have a night out or better still a weekend away, just you and your partner, no kids," parenting psychotherapist Dr. Karen Phillips said per Essential Kids.

Parents also need to mind self-care and treat themselves once in a while. They should not feel ashamed about seeking help from friends or family. Learn more about parental burnout in the video below.

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