'Busy Mom' Obsession Needs To Stop, Experts Say

By Abbie Kraft, Parent Herald May 06, 04:00 am
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Baby hippo spotted hitching a ride on her mum
Mothers are advised to minimize their busy workload for them to be productive. PICTURED: Summer Miller, 5, and her mother Tammy James walk along a beach which was not as busy as last year as people stayed away due to the threat of contamination from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico on July 4, 2010 in Gulf Shores,Alabama.
(Photo : Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Motherhood is a tough task, but there are those who can easily juggle work and parenting. Working moms are starting to develop the urge to stay busy and struggle to keep their work-life balance, which turns out to be harmful to their mental health.

Seeking validation from being busy is becoming the norm for the majority of working moms. Mothers are urged to keep their workload at bay and establish a work-life balance as too much work can lead to health complications.

Saran Forshaw, a 47-year-old office administration officer, shares her story of seeking validation on being the "busy mom with most balls," and how it affected her overall health. Forshaw explains that she finds it difficult to slow down as she is accustomed to heavy workload, according to Daily Mail.

Forshaw shares from her personal experience where she mentions that most women in this generation are addicted to being busy. Cooking and cleaning after coming home from work are also something that boosts her ego with the impression that the busier she gets, the more productive she is.

There are thousands or even millions of women that are going through the same experience as that of Saran, where business is linked to productiveness. Health care providers, however, warn career women, telling them to take it slow.

"Women - especially women who have to juggle multiple roles - feel the effects of intensive work experiences and that can set the table for a variety of illnesses and disability," Allard Dembe, professor of health services management, as reported by a health publication AAAS. People don't think that much about how their early work experiences affect them down the road. Women in their 20s, 30s, and 40s are setting themselves up for problems later in life."

Career and parenting may be something uplifting for most women, but they should remember to pause and focus on their health as well. Long hours of work can lead to heart diseases, cancer and even diabetes.

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