Pregnancy, Babies, Parenting News & Tips

Study Finds One in Four Patients with Newly-Diagnosed Erectile Dysfunction is a Young Man

By Staff Reporter / Jun 06, 2013 10:05 PM EDT

In a recent analysis of one outpatient clinic, one in four men seeking medical help for newly-developed erectile dysfunction (ED) was younger than 40 years, and nearly half of young men with the condition had severe ED. While larger population-based studies are needed, the findings, which were published in The Journal of Sexual Medicine, suggest that erectile dysfunction in young men may be more prevalent and more serious than previously thought.

Like Us on Facebook

Erectile dysfunction is a common complaint in men over 40 years of age. Prevalence increases with age, but the prevalence and risk factors of erectile dysfunction among younger men have been scantly analyzed. The research that has been done paints a vague picture, reporting prevalence rates ranging between two percent and nearly 40 percent.

To provide more clarity, Paolo Capogrosso, MD, of the University Vita-Salute San Raffaele, in Milan, Italy, and his colleagues assessed the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of 439 men seeking medical help for newly-developed erectile dysfunction between January 2010 and June 2012 at a single academic outpatient clinic.

Of the 439 patients, 114 (26 percent) were aged 40 years or younger. Compared with older patients, younger patients had a lower average body mass index, a higher average level of testosterone in the blood, and a lower rate of other medical conditions. (Only 9.6 percent of younger patients had one or more concomitant medical conditions compared with 41.7 percent among older patients.) Younger ED patients smoked cigarettes and used illicit drugs more frequently than older patients. Premature ejaculation was more common in younger men, whereas Peyronie's disease (bent erection from scar tissue) was more prevalent in older patients. Severe erectile dysfunction was found in 48.8 percent of younger patients and 40 percent of older patients while the rates of mild, mild-to-moderate, and moderate erectile dysfunction were not significantly different between the two groups.

"These findings, taken together with those of other studies showing the importance of erectile dysfunction as a potential "sentinel marker" of major diseases, outline the importance of taking a comprehensive medical and sexual history and to perform a thorough physical examination in all men with erectile dysfunction, irrespective of their age," said Dr. Capogrosso.

"Erectile function, in general, is a marker for overall cardiovascular function - this is the first research showing evidence of severe erectile dysfunction in a population of men 40 years of age or younger" stated Irwin Goldstein, editor-in-chief of The Journal of Sexual Medicine. "Clinically, when younger patients have presented with erectile dysfunction, we have in the past had a bias that their ED was primarily psychologic-based and vascular testing was not needed. We now need to consider regularly assessing the integrity of arterial inflow in young patients - identifying arterial pathology in such patients may be very relevant to their overall long-term health."

Provided by Wiley
Featured Video : Never Leave Your Child Alone in the Car: Parents Urged to Take Heat Stroke Seriously Before it's too late

Johnson & Johnson pulls controversial hysterectomy tool from market

Johnson & Johnson is withdrawing from the global market a device used during hysterectomies and other uterine procedures after reports that it may spread and accelerate the growth of undetected cancer inside women.

Read More »

Fear of Losing Money, Not Spending Habits, Affects Investor Risk Tolerance

As the U.S. economy slowly recovers, many investors remain wary about investing in the stock market. Investors' "risk tolerance," or their willingness to take risks, is an important factor for investors deciding whether, and how much, to invest in the stock market. Now, Michael Guillemette, an assistant professor of personal financial planning in the University of Missouri College of Human Environmental Sciences, along with David Nanigian, an associate professor at the American College, analyzed the causes of risk tolerance and found that loss aversion, or the fear of losing money, is the primary factor that explains investors' risk tolerance.

Read More »

Research Reveals Pervasive Implicit Hierarchies for Race, Religion, and Age

As much as social equality is advocated in the United States, a new study suggests that besides evaluating their own race and religion most favorably, people share implicit hierarchies for racial, religious, and age groups that may be different from their conscious, explicit attitudes and values.

Read More »

Girls who start dieting at a young age are more likely to be obese by 30

New research found that girls who begin dieting at a young age may face health problems later in life.

Read More »

Many depressed preschoolers still suffer in later school years

Children diagnosed with depression as preschoolers are likely to suffer from depression as school-age children and young adolescents, new research shows.

Read More »

Birth weight and breastfeeding have implications for children’s health decades later, study finds

Young adults who were breastfed for three months or more as babies have a significantly lower risk of chronic inflammation associated with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, according to research from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

Read More »

Infants smell threats by mother's odor: Study

The sense of smell seems to be behind a mother's ability to pass specific fears to her infant in the first days of life. Scientists believe fear can be passed between generations, with mother to child the primary route.

Read More »

Preterm children's brains can catch up years later

There's some good news for parents of preterm babies - latest research from the University of Adelaide shows that by the time they become teenagers, the brains of many preterm children can perform almost as well as those born at term.

Read More »

First Grade Reading Suffers in Segregated Schools

A groundbreaking study from the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute has found that African-American students in first grade experience smaller gains in reading when they attend segregated schools-but the students' backgrounds likely are not the cause of the differences.

Read More »

Lifestyle affects risks of developing metabolic syndrome in childhood cancer survivors: Study

Leading a healthy lifestyle may lower childhood cancer survivors' risk of developing the metabolic syndrome, says a study.

Read More »

​Children with Disabilities Benefit from Classroom Inclusion

Language skills improve when preschoolers with disabilities are included in classes with typical peers

Read More »

Preschoolers With Special Needs Benefit From Peers’ Strong Language Skills

The guiding philosophy for educating children with disabilities has been to integrate them as much as possible into a normal classroom environment, with the hope that peers' skills will help bring them up to speed. A new study provides empirical evidence that peers really can have an impact on a child's language abilities, for better or worse.

Read More »

Real Time Analytics