Pregnancy, Babies, Parenting News & Tips

Busy Philipps Defends her Decision on Naming Daughters Birdie and Cricket

By Staff Reporter / Jul 12, 2013 09:27 AM EDT
  • Busy Philipps
  • (Photo : Reuters) Busy Philipps does not think choosing unusual names can pose any harm to her daughters.

Busy Philipps does not think choosing unusual names can pose any harm to her daughters.

The 34-year-old "Cougar Town" actress and husband Marc Silverstein welcomed their second child, a baby girl July 2. The couple has a four-year-old daughter named Birdie Leigh.

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The new mom has been under severe criticism since her second daughter's unusual name was revealed to the world recently - Cricket Pearl.

"Cricket and Birdie???? Do these people have no idea how bad their children are going to be picked on? I know they hear all of the bullying stories around the world, and yet they still want to name their children these ridiculous names. Such a shame," one of the comments appeared on an E! News read, while another one added: "Really? That poor child, that is a horrible name!"

However, Philipps took to Twitter Thursday to defend her decision of giving unusual names to her daughters.

"It's weird people think my kids will be in therapy because of their names," she wrote. "Guys, my kids will be therapy for LOTS of reasons, I'm sure."

Philipps, well-known for her supporting roles on the television series "Freaks and Geeks", tied the knot with screenwriter Silverstein in 2007. Their first daughter, Birdie was born in 2008. Philipps announced her second pregnancy in December, 2012.

Celebrity babies have been getting new trendy names recently- baby North West (Kim Kardashian and Kanye West ), Rainbow Aurora Rotella (Holly Madison and Pasquale Rotella), Rosalind Arusha Arkadina Altalune Florence Thurman-Busson (Uma Thurman and Arpad Busson).

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