Pregnancy, Babies, Parenting News & Tips

Jessica Simpson Teases in Sexy White Swimsuit [PHOTO]

By Staff Reporter / Nov 18, 2013 12:47 PM EST

Tags : Jessica Simpson, celebrities, celebrity babies, celebrity moms

  • Jessica Simpson
  • (Photo : Instagram) Jessica Simpson in white bathing suit during a photoshoot

Jessica Simpson received a lot of controversy surrounding her weight gain during her first pregnancy. Now, just five months after the birth of her second baby, the singer, actress and entrepreneur showed her fans a sneak peak of herself in a white bikini as she prepares to show off her post-baby figure.

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The curvy blond retweeted the photo of herself posted by her stylist Nicole Chavez. The 33-year-old is seen

laying poolside in what appears to be a halter one-piece swimsuit, with her hair flowing around her shoulders as she looks away from the camera.

"Guess which mama I get to play dress up with today?" her stylist Nicole Chavez wrote. Shortly after, Simpson retweeted the photo and added: ";) @JSCollection."

The photo shoot was done on Friday, Nov. 15 as part of her upcoming ads for her jessica Simpson Collection.

Jessica Simpson has two children, a girl named Maxwell, 19 months and son Ace, 5 months. The "Fashion Star" mentor has been working out since giving birth to her baby boy in June. One week earlier, she shared a picture of herself while working with Weight Watchers.

 

Jessica Simpson shows off her post baby figure (Instagram)
Jessica Simpson shows off her post baby figure (Instagram)

"Couldn't stop smiling on set for my new @weightwatchers campaign today! #happy," she wrote on Nov. 8. In the photo, Simpson dressed in tight-fitting jeans and a white button up for the shoot. The program previously helped her drop 70 pounds after giving birth to Maxwell in May 2012.

"I'm a lot more confident this time around," the former Fashion Star mentor told Tumblr's MomFeeds blog in an interview in late October. "With Maxwell I didn't think about the weight I was gaining, and the first time I stepped on a scale and looked at the number...I mean, that wasn't a number I had ever even considered...and I was faced with a pretty serious truth," she revealed.

Simpson's fiance, former football player Eric Johnson, also helps keep the star motivated. "The great thing about Eric is that when he played football, he was always conscious of his weight and either gaining or losing, so he knows what it's like and he's helpful," she says. "Plus, he loves me and always makes me feel beautiful...so he's awesome." 

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