Pregnancy, Babies, Parenting News & Tips

Judge Orders to Keep Brain Dead Girl on Ventilator for a Week: UPDATE

By Camille H / Dec 24, 2013 11:19 AM EST

Tags : judge, orders, keep, brain, dead, girl, ventilator, week, update

  • Judge Orders to Keep Brain Dead Girl on Ventilator for a Week: UPDATE
  • (Photo : Jahi/Personal Photo) Judge Orders to Keep Brain Dead Girl on Ventilator for a Week: UPDATE

The judge involved in the case of a 13-year old girl who is currently brain dead after undergoing tonsillectomy doctors orders to keep the girl on a ventilator for another week, the Daily Mail reports.

Like Us on Facebook

Alameda County Judge Evelio Grillo orders for 13-year old Jahi McMath to be independently examined by Paul Graham Fisher, the chief of child neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine. The hospital was ordered to keep the girl on ventilator until December 30 or until further order from the court. Jahi suffered from complications following a tonsillectomy earlier this month at Children's Hospital in Oakland. She was declared brain dead on December 12.

Jahi's family, believing that she is still alive, obtained a temporary restraining order against the hospital in the hopes of keeping her hooked up to a respirator and eventually move her to another facility. "This fight is going to go until Jahi wakes up or we can get her to another facility. But we're not going to allow anyone to pull the plug on this girl," Omari Sealey, Jahi's uncle, said after the ruling.

The examination is set to take place on Monday and Tuesday and hospital staff, as well as Fisher will be conducting an electroencephalogram or EEG, and tests to see if blood is still flowing to Jahi's brain. "It's wrong for someone who made mistakes on your child to just call the coroner and not respect the family's feelings or rights," said Sandra Chatman, Jahi's grandmother. "I know Jahi suffered and it tears me up."

Jahi's family also asked Judge Grillo to allow a third evaluation by Paul Byrne, a pediatric professor at the University of Toledo and co-editor of the book "Beyond Brain Death". However, the hospital's attorney objected saying that Byrne is not a pediatric neurologist.

© 2014 ParentHerald.com All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.
Featured Video : Never Leave Your Child Alone in the Car: Parents Urged to Take Heat Stroke Seriously Before it's too late

Johnson & Johnson pulls controversial hysterectomy tool from market

Johnson & Johnson is withdrawing from the global market a device used during hysterectomies and other uterine procedures after reports that it may spread and accelerate the growth of undetected cancer inside women.

Read More »

Fear of Losing Money, Not Spending Habits, Affects Investor Risk Tolerance

As the U.S. economy slowly recovers, many investors remain wary about investing in the stock market. Investors' "risk tolerance," or their willingness to take risks, is an important factor for investors deciding whether, and how much, to invest in the stock market. Now, Michael Guillemette, an assistant professor of personal financial planning in the University of Missouri College of Human Environmental Sciences, along with David Nanigian, an associate professor at the American College, analyzed the causes of risk tolerance and found that loss aversion, or the fear of losing money, is the primary factor that explains investors' risk tolerance.

Read More »

Research Reveals Pervasive Implicit Hierarchies for Race, Religion, and Age

As much as social equality is advocated in the United States, a new study suggests that besides evaluating their own race and religion most favorably, people share implicit hierarchies for racial, religious, and age groups that may be different from their conscious, explicit attitudes and values.

Read More »

Girls who start dieting at a young age are more likely to be obese by 30

New research found that girls who begin dieting at a young age may face health problems later in life.

Read More »

Many depressed preschoolers still suffer in later school years

Children diagnosed with depression as preschoolers are likely to suffer from depression as school-age children and young adolescents, new research shows.

Read More »

Birth weight and breastfeeding have implications for children’s health decades later, study finds

Young adults who were breastfed for three months or more as babies have a significantly lower risk of chronic inflammation associated with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, according to research from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

Read More »

Infants smell threats by mother's odor: Study

The sense of smell seems to be behind a mother's ability to pass specific fears to her infant in the first days of life. Scientists believe fear can be passed between generations, with mother to child the primary route.

Read More »

Preterm children's brains can catch up years later

There's some good news for parents of preterm babies - latest research from the University of Adelaide shows that by the time they become teenagers, the brains of many preterm children can perform almost as well as those born at term.

Read More »

First Grade Reading Suffers in Segregated Schools

A groundbreaking study from the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute has found that African-American students in first grade experience smaller gains in reading when they attend segregated schools-but the students' backgrounds likely are not the cause of the differences.

Read More »

Lifestyle affects risks of developing metabolic syndrome in childhood cancer survivors: Study

Leading a healthy lifestyle may lower childhood cancer survivors' risk of developing the metabolic syndrome, says a study.

Read More »

​Children with Disabilities Benefit from Classroom Inclusion

Language skills improve when preschoolers with disabilities are included in classes with typical peers

Read More »

Preschoolers With Special Needs Benefit From Peers’ Strong Language Skills

The guiding philosophy for educating children with disabilities has been to integrate them as much as possible into a normal classroom environment, with the hope that peers' skills will help bring them up to speed. A new study provides empirical evidence that peers really can have an impact on a child's language abilities, for better or worse.

Read More »

Real Time Analytics