Pregnancy, Babies, Parenting News & Tips

Daniela Ruah Welcomes Baby Boy with Fiancé David Olsen

By Vishakha Sonawane / Jan 06, 2014 09:51 AM EST
  • Daniela Ruah, baby
  • (Photo : REUTERS/Eric Gaillard) Daniela Ruah now is a mom to a baby boy! The ‘NCIS: Los Angeles’ star welcomed her first baby with fiancé David Olsen, Monday.

Daniela Ruah now is mom to a baby boy! The 'NCIS: Los Angeles' star welcomed her first baby with fiancé David Olsen, Monday.

Daniela, who is known for her role as Special Agent Kensi Blye confirmed to PEOPLE magazine the birth of her son, River Isaac Ruah Olsen. "He's healthy and strong, which is all we could ask for," Daniela told PEOPLE. "We are so happy, so thankful and feel so blessed to have brought him into the world."

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She announced her pregnancy last September. "I'm so thrilled about having a baby boy and starting a new chapter as a parent with David," she told PEOPLE. "It's amazing how in love I am with this little person I've only seen on a black and white screen," she added. "I'm starting my own family and there is no other feeling like it."

The 30-year-old actress met Olsen on the sets of 'NCIS: LA.' Olsen is a stunt double for younger brother Eric Christian Olsen, who is a part of the show. He is a former Navy SEAL.

Daniela began her acting career in Portuguese soap operas when she was a teen. She played the role of Sara at the age of 16 in the soap opera 'Jardins Proibidos' (Forbidden Gardens).

After turning 18, Daniela went to London and studied at the London Metropolitan University, where she grabbed a First in Performing Arts. She then returned to Portugal to continue her acting career. She won the Portuguese version of the 'Dancing with the Stars' and got main roles in television series, short films, and theatre.

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