Pregnancy, Babies, Parenting News & Tips

Supernatural's Jensen Ackles and Wife Danneel Harris Expecting a Baby

By Renee Anderson / Jan 08, 2013 07:50 AM EST
  • Jensen Ackles & Danneel Harris
  • (Photo : Danneel Harris/Twitter) Jensen Ackles & Danneel Harris welcome first child.

Jensen Ackles and wife Danneel Harris are expanding their family. The 34-year-old "Supernatural" star confirmed the news to People magazine.

Later, mom-to-be Harris confirmed the news on Twitter.

"Thank you for all the well wishes," Harris wrote Jan. 7. "We are very excited about our soon to be new addition."

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The news comes shortly after co-star Jared Padalecki, who plays the role of Ackles' brother, and wife Genevieve Cortese welcomed a baby boy named Thomas Colton.

Fans of the actor/director took to Twitter to congratulate the expecting couple.

"@DanneelHarris Congratulations hun :) May this little parcel of joy bring prosperity, joy & luck to you & your husband! Love you all xx," one of the fans Tweeted.

"I AM CRYING WITH EXCITEMENT. Congrats to you and Jensen!!!" another follower added.

Ackles met model/actress Harris during the shooting of short film "The Plight of Clownana".  The couple dated for three years and got engaged in 2009. They tied the knot in 2010.

"Ultimately [I] want someone who you can pal around with and also be intimate with," Ackles told People magazine in 2006, about his concept of a perfect partner. "Someone who can laugh at your jokes. It may sound cheesy, but someone who can be your best friend as well as your love."

Ackles, who started modeling as a toddler, shot to fame by appearing on NBC television network's soap opera "Days of Our Lives". He currently appears in the CW series "Supernatural".

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