How To Make Dyslexia An Asset

By Louie Johnson, Parent Herald November 10, 11:17 am

People with dyslexia often confuse letters and numbers that have similar appearances. Because of this, they have difficulties in spelling words, reading, writing, pronouncing words when reading aloud and understanding it. Children with dyslexia use nearly five times the brain area to do the same language task as the controls. These means their brains were working a lot harder and using more energy than the average children. But dyslexics often have enormous talents in other parts of their brain and shine in many fields. Einstein was a dyslexic, and so were inventor Thomas Edison and financier Charles Schwab. So what could parents do to help their children with such disability to cope?

First, obtain a medical evaluation. If a child has a learning disabled, they will need emotional support. Then, take advantage of any unique program the child's school might have, such as tutoring. Enlist the teacher's cooperation. Learning-disabled children are often forgetful and disorganized, so ask for a second set of textbooks that could provide for use at home. It is best for a dyslexic child to read aloud, so have a short daily reading session that parents can use to offer feedback and correction. Maths can be taught in practical ways such as measuring quantities in recipes, using a ruler in carpentry or shopping. Build on the child's strength and encourage them. No matter how small, praise and reward ANY accomplishment. A child can learn, just differently from others and takes a little longer.

A show created by Miss Peggy Stern, who is also dyslexia, shows ways to cope with the disorder. "You don't overcome dyslexia," she said. "You learn to have different tricks and ways to compensate." The show highlights how children with dyslexia are just the same as children without it. One of the actors also have dyslexia and said that her friends were envious of her role on the show. So it made her feel good about having dyslexia.

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