Teen Birth Rates In America Dropped To Lowest Point With Highest Decline In Urban Areas Only, Rural Areas Still On High

By Collie Lane, Parent Herald November 17, 12:05 am
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Teen birth rate in the United States dropped to a record low, with the biggest drop in vast urban areas and the slightest drops in the countryside, according to federal data. The findings revealed that starting 2007 up to 2015, birth rates among teenage girls aged 15 - 19 dropped 50 percent in vast urban areas, while the prices in the countryside fell 37 percent only.

Scientific studies on the rates of teen birth have revealed a decline since the 1900s, however, in its most recent report, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention disintegrated differences among teenagers in urban and rural counties. The data have shown that since 2007 up to 2015, among adolescents age 15 - 19, birth rates dropped to 50 percent in urban counties, while rates in rural counties fell to only 37 percent. Overall, in the national average, teen birth rates dropped to 47.6 percent.

However, there was one outlier: Teen birth rates in rural counties of Connecticut dropped to 73 percent. The decline was super cheap in rural parts of Alaska at 13 percent, and some of the smallest declines with the decrease of below 30 percent were Pennsylvania, North Dakota, Montana, and Maryland.

The second-highest teen birth rate decline was Colorado. Colorado also topped among decreased teen birth rates in urban counties, as did Minnesota, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Arizona and 17 more states got a reduction of 50 percent or more. In North Dakota, urban areas had the lowest decline at 24 percent as well as West Virginia also had a decrease of below 34 percent.

So what contribute to this difference of drop in teen birth rates in America? The answer lies in a 2015 report made by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy.

According to the report, it was found out that teenagers in rural counties have limited access to public clinics which offer subsidized or free contraceptive methods and online resources. Moreover, they more likely to be poor and may face problems in transportation.

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