Secure Attachment Parenting: Does It Develop By Nature Or Is It Motivated By Nurture?

By Abbie Kraft, Parent Herald January 11, 10:10 pm
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Experts finally shed light in regards to John Bowlby's theory of attachment. It was revealed that the said trait is being formed, and does not develop naturally.
(Photo : Miquel Benitez/Getty Images)

It's been an ongoing debate as to whether parenting security among children is developed through nature or nurture. According to John Bowlby's theory of attachment, however, it was explained that attachment security is something that is developed through nurture.

Attachment security is said to develop a bond between a parent and a child, and it does not innately develop. It is also an important factor when it comes to child development as it can be carried on towards adulthood, as mentioned on Psychology Today.

Secure attachment, on the other hand, is a strong comfortable bond between a parent and a child, wherein the child feels secure, loved and understood. It is the calm and comfortable feeling of a child, knowing that the parent fully understands him/her.

A secure attachment between a child and a parent is beneficial as it creates a positive impact on a child's overall health, including the child's social and emotional well-being. According to Help Guide, it paves a way to a child's success, may it be socially or academically.

It was perceived that a secure attachment can be filled with love. However, it was mentioned that the parent needs to secure the child's needs, especially when it comes to nourishment, education and social needs.

There is a thin line that divides security attachment and a parent-child bonding. Security attachment is the strong emotional connection between a parent and the child, wherein it is emotionally developed. It requires the parent to focus on the child's emotional and social state, where the parent would be aware of what's going on with the child's life.

Attachment gives the parent the capability to communicate with the child through non-verbal communication. Bonding, on the other hand, is more task-oriented when it comes to fulfilling the child's needs. Bonding is the capability to do things at your own pace, where the child would have to cope with, while attachment is adjusting to the child's pace and learning the child's non-verbal signs on how he/she feels.

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