Transgender Bathroom Case Of Gavin Grimm Sent Back To Lower Court After SC Refuses To Hear It

By Claire Parker, Parent Herald March 08, 10:18 am

Bathroom laws designed to not allow transgender teens to use the bathrooms that do not correspond to their gender when they were born continue to be a hot issue and the latest concerns the transgender Virginia teen named Gavin Grimm. The case was refused to be heard by the Supreme Court and was sent back to the lower court.

Grimm fought the transgender bathroom bill in his state in the past as he fought for his right to use the boy's bathroom at his high school. The Supreme Court decided on Monday that the case will not be heard by them and this disappointed not only Grimm but also his many supporters.

The decision came days after the Trump administration revoked the federal guidance issued by President Barack Obama. The guidance directed public schools to let transgender students use the bathrooms they are most comfortable with. The Supreme Court relied on the guidance when they sided with Grimm in the past and because the guidance was revoked, the case was sent back to the lower court for reconsideration, The Washington Post reported.

Many advocated for transgender students feared Donald Trump's decision will affect how the pending cases regarding transgender bathroom bills will be decided. They also said they believe Trump's decision will embolden schools to further ban transgender students from using the bathroom of their choice. Eliza Byard, the executive director of the national Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, said the announcement of the Supreme Court could lead to further confusion to other individuals who might think the decision is a license to discriminate.

Sarah Warbelow, the legal director of the Human Rights Campaign, also shared, "Thousands of transgender students across the country will have to wait even longer for a final decision from our nation's highest court affirming their basic rights." Grimm or his family did not release any statement regarding the announcement yet, The New York Times noted.

Other cases regarding bills against transgender people and their use of bathrooms included those in North Carolina. Government buildings also required transgender people to use the bathroom that corresponds to their gender and not their gender identity. North Carolina was the first state that implemented the controversial law and due to that, many artists refused to perform in the area and businesses also stayed away from investing or expanding in the state.

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