Two-Year-Old Toddler Defies Racism With Doll Choice

By Abbie Kraft, Parent Herald April 05, 09:51 pm
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A girl holds a play doll at the YMCA kindergarten on December 3, 2014 in Jerusalem, Israel.
(Photo : Lior Mizrahi/Getty Image)

A two-year-old toddler confused a Target cashier with the doll that she chose for a prize. Brandi Benner narrated her daughter's experience at Target after one of its employees called out her daughter for buying a doll that "does not look like her."

Racial diversity and inclusion may be something harsh for adults as it is often disregarded but for kids, color is just color. A photo of a two-year-old girl clutching a black doll becomes viral on the internet, which instantly gathered praises.

The girl's mother Brandi opened up about their experience on Target when a cashier was stunned with the little girl's decision to buy a black doll. Brandi stated that she and her husband Nick decided to get their two-year-old daughter, Sophia, a prize for being potty-trained according to the feature story by New York Post.

Sophia happily chose a new doll, a black one dressed in a doctor's suit with a stethoscope. When the family was paying for it, the cashier asked the toddler if she's sure about her choice, to which she confirmed "Yes, please" in a low soft voice.

The cashier then offered her a different option stating that the store has different doll choices. She then pointed out that Sophia could choose a doll that looks like her. Sophia declined her offer and she even pointed out how pretty her doll is.

"This experience just confirmed my belief that we aren't born with the idea that color matters," Brandi stated. "Skin comes in different colors just like hair and eyes and every shade is beautiful."

Children, in general, are free from racism and gender bias, thus it is important for parents to be keen when it comes to education their children on sensitive topics. Baby Center cites that parents should at least expose their children to all shades.

It was also mentioned that parents should keep their answers direct when it comes to answering a question regarding race and gender. And most importantly, experts advised parents not to overreact when their children would want to know about these topics.

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