Super-Sized Babies In Childbirth: Why Are Newborn Infants Getting Bigger And Bigger?

By Amanda Moore, Parent Herald April 09, 08:14 am
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Experts point to the mom's pregnancy weight as a significant factor as to why infants in childbirth are becoming bigger.
(Photo : Ian Waldie/Getty Images )

Are super-sized babies becoming a trend in childbirth? Have you noticed how newborns are getting bigger and bigger?

Mom Natashia Corrigan did not have an ordinary childbirth. She shocked friends and family when she gave birth to a 13.36 lbs. son last January because she did it naturally and without any epidural.

Corrigan's doctors told her in advance that her son, Brian, would be a very big baby, at least 11 lbs., as per Huffington Post. Corrigan has two other kids who were born slightly bigger as well, at eight and seven lbs.

Brian's birth, however, was the first time the mom delivered without any medication. Instead, laughing gas helped her during labor. "I think I was in a bit of shock because the birth was natural and I only had gas so I was still in a bit of shock just from that," the mom told Yahoo! 7 News.

In 2010, study experts noted babies' birth weight in the U.S. is generally getting smaller compared to two decades ago, as per Harvard Medical School. However, there's cause for alarm as big babies, although fewer in numbers are getting bigger. They are indeed becoming super-sized.

Experts point out one factor to this trend as the mothers' weight. Many women are already obese or overweight before getting pregnant. In fact, 45 percent of mothers-to-be have weight problems compared to just 24 percent in 1983, as per Stuff New Zealand.

Doctors always emphasize to pregnant moms why a healthy weight gain of around 25 to 35 pounds is important for the baby's development. Too much weight gain, however, is dangerous.

"Excessive weight gain during pregnancy increases women's risks of retaining that weight postpartum, and also of having a child who becomes obese," obstetrics professor Lisa Bodnar said in the Stuff report. Bigger babies are prone to develop serious diseases such as heart conditions or diabetes as adults.

It's highly recommended for pregnant moms to do mild aerobics and keep an active lifestyle unless otherwise told by doctors. "Adequate physical activity during pregnancy regulates both appetite and energy expenditure, thereby improving birth outcomes for both mother and child," obesity expert Edward Archer said.

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