Is Reverse Menopause Possible? Woman Carries Twins After An Experimental Treatment

By Amanda Moore, Parent Herald April 10, 04:00 am
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Natalia, 40, tried and failed several IVF procedures but after joining a reverse menopause experiment she's now 10 weeks pregnant.
(Photo : Lukas Schulze/Getty Images)

A woman from Greece is pregnant with twins after undergoing an experimental reverse menopause treatment. Reports claim that doctors previously dismissed her case as a lost cause in trying to get pregnant but then she found out about the experiment.

The woman, who was only identified as a 40-year-old lawyer named Natalia, underwent six rounds of hormone therapy in order to get pregnant. All of these procedures failed and she settled on going through adoption next.

Her doctors, however, advised her of an experimental technic that might just help her case. It's administered through a blood plasma injection in her womb and ovaries to revitalize her reproductive organs. Doctors had high hopes this new process reverses menopause, thus giving couples in middle age more chances of getting pregnant, as per The Sunday Times.

Natalia agreed to the procedure and found herself pregnant after just nine days following injections. Doctors told her she's the first woman to conceive after receiving reverse menopause treatments, as per Independent.

Natalia is one of 27 menopausal women who participated in the experiment in Athens last year under Dr. Konstantinos Pantos of the Genesis clinic. She is currently on her 10th pregnancy week. Some 12 women so far manifested ovulation following their treatments as well and the oldest woman is age 49.

"I had nothing to lose. Doctors had already told me I was a lost cause," Natalia said. "But then a miracle followed."

"That in itself is a huge medical milestone," Pantos said of Natalia's successful conception. Researchers, however, indicated the experiment is still in its first phase and the process still required utmost care and observation.

"Ovaries which have gone dormant are starting to work again," Pantos told Cosmopolitan when the experiment started last year. "We don't know if it's temporary or permanent, but it's reassuring."

Pantos' team is working on a scientific paper for the experiment. He, however, admits that the goal of reverse menopause isn't to have women in their '70s or '80s get pregnant. "We're not trying to surpass nature, just extend its boundaries," he said.

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