African-American Infant Mortality Rates Are Twice As High Compared To Other Races

By Abbie Kraft, Parent Herald April 12, 06:38 am
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African-American infant mortality rate continually soar as the years progress.
(Photo : Abid Katib/Getty Images)

The African-American infant mortality rate in the United States significantly increased by 2017. Statistics revealed that U.S. has one of the highest mortality rates for children below one-year-old.

The United States has been struggling in keeping their numbers low in terms of infant mortality rate. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced that America has the highest infant mortality rates compared to other wealthy countries.

Babies that are born in the U.S. are less likely to survive three times compared to their babies born in other first world countries. In every 1,000 babies, 6.1 infant die in the United States, as per Scary Mommy.

In Alabama, specifically, CDC noted that their infant rate runs from 8.7 infant deaths to every 1,000 babies that are born in 2010. The majority of these children were African-American, according to ABC.

"There are significant differences in infant mortality by race and ethnicity; for instance, the mortality rate for black infants is more than twice that of white infants," as mentioned on the CDC website.

One of the biggest factors of the infant mortality rate is the child's living condition, which includes the neighborhood, environment, and diet. Babies that are born in poorer communities and born with parents who are less-educated are less likely to survive. These conditions are often found in African-American or unmarried women, The Nation noted.

Racial discrimination on economic, social and psychological aspects played a vital role in the mortality rate of the African-American children. Neglect in regards to the increasing rates of infant deaths was also described by Zoe Carpenter of the Nation.

There are several ways to combat the increasing number of infant mortality. Being physically active can keep the mother and the child healthy. CDC also advises to avoid excessive alcohol drinking and drug use.

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