Three Relationships That May Take A Toll On A Couple's Marriage

By Olivia Etienne, Parent Herald April 28, 11:46 pm
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Marital problems may be caused by these relationships that every spouse needs to be aware of. PICTURED: A newlywed couple pose for photographs on a rooftop of an old Istanbul Han overlooking the Bosphorus strait on March 18, 2017 in Istanbul, Turkey.
(Photo : Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Being married does not mean it's the end of having a relationship with others. It's a basic need for human growth and development. Relationships, however, no matter how platonic they are, affect an individual's marriage and it can either be positive or negative.

Maintaining relationship outside marriage is healthy, but there are instances that it can cross the line. Here are a few of them that every married individual should be aware of, as noted by Fox News.

Individuals often see the brighter side of a person while at work, and this is how "work spouses" are born out of. This makes a person more attractive, at times even more admirable than their spouse, because we tend to put our nicest characteristics forward at these times.

At home, though, bills and other domestic responsibilities await a tired person. Often, this is what spouses see each other.

New York-based relationship therapist Rachel Sussman says that to curb underlying attraction with work spouses, it helps to stop bantering at-home dilemmas with them. Over-divulging family secrets is also a no-go for people who are trying to detach from their work spouses.

The infamous relationship with mothers-in-law is also often considered a trigger in marriages. In-laws have a reputation to creep in the center of every marital decision. Sussman says that it's hard to maintain a peaceful relationship with them but there are ways to let them know where they stand.

Most rifts brought by in-laws stems from conflicting expectations and assumptions that are unspoken, according to Newsweek. Hence, the solution to this? Openly communicate with them.

Lastly, the spouse's best friend. They may often be an external source of support for some family, but at times, they can be the reason a relationship is on-the-rocks.

A study reveals that it's best to marry your best friend, as per Huffington Post. Sometimes, however, a best friend and a spouse are not the same person. When a spouse becomes overtly close to a friend, jealousy can arise in a marriage.

Spouses, particularly women, tend to overthink the relationship and panic. "Women are always thinking, Why does he have a best female friend? Is she secretly in love with him? What are they talking about?" Sussman said.

The therapist added that the main concerns in this are privacy and commitment. BFF-related jealousy can be addressed if the couple talks to each other regarding the matter and sets up an appropriate line for interaction.

Are you guilty of any of these relationships? Let us know by commenting your thoughts below!

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