Helicopter Parenting Plays A Major Factor In Raising Unemployable Children

By Abbie Kraft, Parent Herald May 06, 04:00 am
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Helicopter parents are more likely to produce unemployable children. PICTURED: Angel Nicols, aged 12, does his homework studies online before a show in the tiny caravan he shares with his mother, as he travels around England with Mr Fips' Wonder Circus on April 7, 2014 in Huntingdon, England.
(Photo : Mary Turner/Getty Image)

Helicopter parents have been making the headline as the said parenting style can potentially do more harm than good. Studies suggest that helicopter parents tend to raise unemployable children due to their persistence to do everything for their child.

Several studies have already explained that helicopter parenting can be harmful to the children's growth as they are always pampered. Doing everything for the children out of love may seem ideal, but it restricts the children's capacity to learn and grow on their own, as explained by Parents.

Helicopter parents mostly mean well but some fail to recognize that their over-devotion for their children as a disadvantage. Experts note that balance and learning to let go when the time comes are the most important things to good parenting.

Hovering over the child's daily activities and tasks can highly affect their independence, which can have a long-term impact on their personalities. People raised by helicopter parents would often find it difficult to land a job, and stick to it, according to Huffington Post.

Helicopter parents would tend to fix everything for their kids, up to a point where they would intervene to personal conflicts. By doing so, the children are not given a chance to develop their social skills and may find it hard to resolve issues with their colleagues in the future.

Most millennials were raised by helicopter parents, thus, they grew up to be more depressed,  The Washington Post reported. The majority of the young adults struggle to cope with their daily lives as they were highly comfortable during their childhood.

Depression rates among millennials continually soar, especially for those in college. A 2012 study done by the American College Counseling Association explain that 44 percent of college students experience symptoms of depression, and the numbers continually increase as the years go by.

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