Pregnancy, Babies, Parenting News & Tips

Only 11 Percent of Children Involved in Bike Accidents Wear a Helmet

By Staff Reporter / Oct 26, 2013 03:32 PM EDT
  • Only 11 Percent of Children Involved in Bike Accidents Wear a Helmet
  • (Photo : Flickr) Only 11 Percent of Children Involved in Bike Accidents Wear a Helmet

Despite a California bike helmet mandate, only 11 percent of Los Angeles County children treated for bike-related injuries were wearing a helmet, according to an abstract presented Oct. 26 at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition in Orlando. Specifically, children older than age 12, and low-income and minority children were less likely to wear a bike helmet.

Like Us on Facebook

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 33 million children ride bicycles for nearly 10 billion hours each year. Unfortunately, bicycle crashes and bicycle-related head injuries cause 150,000 emergency department visits and nearly 400 deaths each year.

In the abstract, "Racial/Ethnic and Socioeconomic Disparities in the Use of Helmets in Children Involved in Bicycle Accidents," researchers reviewed the records of all pediatric patients involved in bicycle-related accidents from the Los Angeles County database between 2006 and 2011. The information included helmet use, age, gender, insurance status and race/ethnicity. Further analysis sought to determine whether helmet use was associated with the need for emergency surgery, morbidity, mortality and length of hospital stay.

There were 1,248 children involved in bicycle-related accidents in Los Angeles County. The median age of these children was 13; 64 percent were male. Overall, 11.3 percent of patients wore helmets, with some ethnic-based differences: 35.2 percent of white children wore helmets, compared to 7 percent of Asian children, 6 percent of black children, and 4 percent of Hispanic children. Researchers also observed differences based on insurance coverage, with 15.2 percent of children with private insurance coverage and 7.6 percent of children with public insurance wearing helmets at the time of injury. Children over age 12 were less likely to wear a helmet.

Overall, 5.9 percent of the injured children required emergency surgery, and 34.1 percent of the children returned to their pre-injury capacity. The mortality rate was 0.7 percent. Of the nine patients who died, eight were not wearing a helmet.

"Our study highlights the need to target minority groups, older children, and those with lower socioeconomic status when implementing bicycle safety programs in Los Angeles County," said study author Veronica F. Sullins, MD.

Regional studies highlighting racial or ethnic and socioeconomic differences may help identify at-risk populations within specific communities, allowing these communities to more effectively use resources, said Dr. Sullins.

"Children and adolescents have the highest rate of unintentional injury and therefore should be a high priority target population for injury-prevention programs," Dr. Sullins said.

Provided by American Academy of Pediatrics
Featured Video : Never Leave Your Child Alone in the Car: Parents Urged to Take Heat Stroke Seriously Before it's too late

Ice Cold Awareness—The ALS Association & The #IceBucketChallenge

In terms of marketing ploys, none may be quite as viral in these past few summer months than the “Ice Bucket Challenge” which has swept through social media by storm. The concept, simple: to either donate funds to the ALS Association or douse yourself with a bucket of ice water. And like a chain mail or massive viral text, the challenge has been spread to the corners of the United States.
Initiated by the ALS Association, a non-profit organization that supports awareness and research into Amyotropohic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the organization has picked up momentum and a bank full of funds from the freezing summertime challenge.

Read More »

Mexican Scientists Develop New Device to Monitor Developing Cardiovascular Disease

With staggering statistics of the American Heart Association and other researchers in the field of cardiology proving that Hispanics/Latinos over the age of 20 have a greater than 30 percent incidence of cardiovascular disease, researchers in Mexico have begun developing a device that will monitor cholesterol and triglyceride levels—all without a single drop of blood.

Read More »

A Fanless PC That Can Keep Its Cool And Still Be Hot—Silent Power PC

The days of the traditional tower PC as we remember them are long gone. The contemporary takes on the personal computer are far sleeker, some might even say chicer than their 90's predecessors. Processors have picked up GB's of speed, memory has expanded exponentially and mother-boards have verged on the borderline microscopic. But what's more, some companies are even ditching the essentials for a more creative approach at high-speed processing.

Read More »

An Exercise in Simplicity—Faraday Café Puts An End to the Social Age

There’s something to be said in the simplicity that we grew up in. Confined by the evolutionary limitations our voices and our feet could manage, before the turn of the digital revolution, humans were a far less social creature… at least in theory. But now that we’re so connected on the internet, and constantly looking for more ways to log on rather than hang out, there are those who think that the simplicity and personal connections we once thrived on are lost.

Read More »

Perseids Meteor Shower 2014 [August 11-12 Live Streaming & Peak Times]: Perseids Play ‘til Tuesday

With the closest extra supermoon we’ll witness for another two decades orbiting just beyond our atmosphere this past weekend, many found that the radiating light-pollution was a distraction to the real show; the Perseids meteor shower.

Read More »

Mexican Copper Mine Contaminates Both Sides of the Border—Toxic Drinking Water

While researchers at the EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne) are studying the results of a 140-cubic-foot oil spill in the North Sea, to identify issues and rapid response in the first 24 hours after a major spill, the Mexican government is far more preoccupied with a much more real situation of pollution near the American border. Only 25 miles south of the Mexican-American border in the province of Cananea, federal officials have reported that approximately 10 million gallons of toxic wastewater from the Buenavista copper mine have entered into nearby rivers, contaminating drinking water and causing massive die-offs in local fish/plant species.

Read More »

So Now You’re A Vegan: How One Small Bug Bite Can Change Your Appetite

Causing quite a bit of stir in parts of the Southwest, scientists discover that a rash outbreak of forced-veganism is likely due to a simple bug bite—but it’s not a temporary issue physicians say.

Read More »

Twice As Likely To Lose a Limb—How Poverty Affects Diabetes

Exposing the large gap in the current healthcare system, with a particular focus on disadvantaged populations, a new study from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UC Los Angeles reveals that lower-income individuals suffering with diabetes have a significantly larger chance of amputation than those living in wealthier areas.

Read More »

Supermoon & Perseids Meteor Shower will Cover Night Sky this Aug. 9-12 Weekend [LIVE STREAM Info]

A summer filled with many memorable moments, the image of a night sky covered in light may be one for the record books, astronomers assure. In the second installment of the supermoon trilogy that is taking place this summer, this Sunday Aug. 10 will take the record for the next two decades as the largest full moon of the quarter-Century.

Read More »

Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Vector Detained in Jail after Fleeing Medical Supervision

Sparking a state-wide manhunt in California after refusing treatment for a highly virulent strain of Tuberculosis, suspect Eduardo Rosas Cruz, 25, was recently arrested in Kern County and detained until he is medically cleared to be transferred, Deputy District Attorney for the San Joaquin County Stephen Taylor told sources.

Read More »

Scientists Find Remnants of A Dwarf White Supernova—Zombie Star of the Cosmos

Like a headline straight from an episode of Star Trek, scientists at NASA confirm that they recently discovered remnants of a “Zombie star” in the galaxy “NGC 1309”, nearly 110 million light-years away. Arising out of a very abnormal situation where an unusually weak supernova reaction obliterated only a portion of the white dwarf star, the researchers published their results yesterday, Aug. 7 in the journal Nature.

Read More »

“Xamaleón”—Defying the Laws of Creamery, One Dessert is A Chameleon in Disguise

Adding a bit of science to the sweetness of ice cream, one Spanish physicist turned culinary mastermind has created a secret weapon he calls “Xamaleón” that’ll blow your mind and your taste buds away. A man of many talents, the master inventor Manuel Linares is Barcelonian marvel, whose many talents can best be explained by his inability to settle for less.

Read More »

Real Time Analytics