Pros And Cons Of ‘Bird’s Nest Parenting’, A Child-Centered Divorce Method

By Zubera, Parent Herald October 19, 06:00 am
Charlotte Tamanaha pushes her son Keido down a hill in a laundry basket in Humboldt Park, taking advantage of more than 18 inches of snow that fell February 2, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. The snowfall was the fifth largest in the city's history.
(Photo : Scott Olson/Getty Images)

A divorcing couple with children has difficult times when it comes to custody or parents living in two separate houses. "Bird's Nest Parenting" is a new parenting idea that is believed to have originated in Virginia, where children stay in one house with parents rotating in and out.

"Bird's Nest Parenting" is increasing in the western countries and slowly spreading to other parts of the world too. As per the Virginia court, this was the best solution for two young children to stay in their family home. This approach is seen as a direct opposite of the usual method applied during a divorce where children are treated similarly to 'frisbees', moving back and forth. 

The pros of "Bird's Nest Parenting" may include but not limited to children not having to move every weekend or every month to the respective parent, and it can promote stability by allowing the kids to remain in their familiar environment. According to parenting experts, "Bird's Nest Parenting" can look different in different households but needs to be made to work for individual children.   

Although, experts say "Bird's Nest Parenting" can help with stability and familiarity for children, psychologist do have opposing comments on this parenting style. It has consequences as well, for it limits the parents to carry on with their own relationships and limits parenting too. It is said to ineffective as a long-term strategy except as a good idea at the beginning of a divorce or transition period.

"This is especially true if there is a particular need for stability. For example, if kids are doing High School exams, or if the children are generally more anxious and sensitive to change," Dr. Monique Robinson of Telethon Kids Institute told  Daily Mail Australia.

Financially unsound - divorcing couples can have a family home with kids and one parent, while the other parent stays out in a smaller flat. This will allow children to have their rooms and beds because the whole "Bird's Nest Parenting" idea is child-centered, the Daily Mail reported.


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