When The Relationship Between Parents And Kids Mutates To A Power Struggle

By Hasan Tariq, Parent Herald November 11, 08:05 am

Are millennial parents entering an era where the parent-child dynamic has entered in a power struggle mode? Nowadays, children aren't as they used to be and it is a prominent fact that power has somewhat shifted from parents to their kids if carefully observed.

Today, it seemed that the days are gone when parents are the bosses and the rulers of each household. The reason? It's the kids that get to have the last say on any matter, whether it's eating, doing chores or choosing clothes.

Parents often give in to their children demands not realizing that this will give them the sense to overpower people. To love a kid is one thing, to spoil and easily give in to all their demands is no way of showing love. Parents should be able to learn when to say NO and when to negotiate with kids.

Giving some freedom to kids is a good thing as it would make them realize what is good for them and what is not. Parents could let their kids pick their clothes, give them options for eating and let them decide what they want. But the parents should also keep an eye on choices their children are making, whether they are healthy and good for them or not.

Children are not born knowing what is right for them and what is not. Hence, parents should guide them through the choices of life.

To trust the children with their choices is one thing but parents should never turn a blind eye at the choices they make. As experts warn, parents could give their children enough power to take control of their life but they should never allow their kids to empower them through their choices saying, "the parents has to be honored as the ultimate person," Macleans quoted.

Meanwhile, in a book titled, "The Intuitive Parent: Why the Best Thing For Your Child Is You," author Stephen Camarata wrote that sometimes parents are also asking too much from their children. Camarata said, "This idea of pushing children to the absolute max of their developmental norm doesn't give them time to reason and problem-solve. It actually undermines both self-confidence and fluid reasoning, or the ability to think." 

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