Pregnancy, Babies, Parenting News & Tips

Melissa Joan Hart's Son Mason Ready to Help Mom by Breastfeeding Infant Brother

By Renee Anderson / Feb 27, 2013 05:51 AM EST
  • Melissa Joan Hart
  • (Photo : Reuters) Melissa Joan Hart juggles big family.

Melissa Joan Hart has to manage a big family, including an infant. However, she is lucky to have the support of her two elder sons who want to help her in everything, including breast-feeding the latest addition to the family - 5-month-old Tucker.

During a chat with Us Weekly recently, the proud mom shared the secret behind managing her responsibilities successfully - help from her sons 6-year-old Mason, 4-year-old Brady and husband Mark Wilkerson.

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"They're protective but more sweet, sensitive brothers," Hart told the magazine, of her elder sons. "One of them [Mason] thought that he could breastfeed and that would help the baby so we had to tell him that's not really how it works!"

It's not the boys alone who want to support the "Melissa & Joey" actress. Her husband of 10 years, Wilkerson, is ready to do anything for his wife and family.

"It's totally a team effort and he is 75 percent of the parenting workload," said the actress, mentioning about husband Wilkerson, lead singer and guitarist of band Course of Nature. "[We] don't want to miss a moment so we try to be there for every opportunity for a bath, every after school activity, every hockey game, every soccer game. We don't want to miss that stuff."

Hart married musician Wilkerson in 2003. The 36-year-old actress gave birth to her third son Tucker in September 2012.

The mom, despite her hectic schedule, is still finding time to enjoy the developments of her little one.

"He smiles and laughs endlessly," the actress told Us Weekly, while talking about Tucker. "He loves the sound of his voice. ... He heard his voice screaming the other day and loved it so now he loves to scream!"

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