Motherhood Pitfalls: Can Working Moms Really Say Goodbye To Worries Over Career And Parenting Balance?

By Danny Wilson, Parent Herald November 22, 04:21 am
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Research reveals that children of working mothers develop stronger set of social skills over peers with full time mommies. Career women delight over news.
(Photo : TheLASELC / Youtube)

Novel research reveals that children with working parents might develop better skills over those who are raised by stay-at-home mothers. Career women are delighted to learn than going back to work might actually be doing their children greater good.

The London School of Economics and Political Science in collaboration with the University of Oxford reveal interesting conclusions of recent studies. Fit Pregnancy reports that children with working mommies might develop a stronger set of skills over peers who were raised by full-time or stay-at-home mothers.

Research results reveal that children who are sent by busy moms to nurseries might develop a stronger set of everyday skills. These children portray a robust set of social skills too.

Home Speech Home lists treating a child as a full communication partner as one of the tips to improve a child's speaking and social skills. The latest research corroborates the tip by explaining that children who spend most of their time in nursery homes get a chance to partner with other children and many babysitters in developing these skills.

These results, however, are not conclusive. Some full-time mothers maybe able to execute a more intentional style of parenting to which some children are more responsive to in terms of speech development.

But researchers stress that children who are sent to nurseries and daycares can become more independent. Spending regular time with fellow children, with minimal intervention from their parents, these children can develop and harness a firm set of social skills.

Researches clarify that the cornerstone is not about who is taking care of your children but instead, it is about what activities they are made to do. Reading, singing, story-telling and role-playing are some of the many activities that help boost children skills. It's a given fact that there's a lot of these activities in nurseries and daycare.

Ultimately, parents are free to choose what works best for their lifestyle. Study author and professor Paul Anand is simply delighted to share that working moms might actually be doing their children a favor by resuming their careers after pregnancy and giving birth.

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