Hugh Jackman Posts Photo Post-Skin Cancer Treatment, Warns People About Not Wearing Sunscreen

By Claire Parker, Parent Herald February 17, 04:00 am
Hugh Jackman undergoing treatment for skin cancer yet again.
(Photo : Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images)

Hugh Jackman, best known for his "Wolverine" movie, is undergoing skin cancer treatment. His latest visit to the doctor prompted him to warn people about not wearing sunscreen as he posted a photo of his latest procedure.

The actor posted a photo with a bandage on his nose on his Twitter account as well as on his Instagram. He is currently undergoing treatment for basal cell carcinoma. The cance, while not the leading cause of skin cancer-related deaths, is the most common form of skin cancer.

For the caption, Jackman wrote, "Another basal cell carcinoma. Thanks to frequent body checks and amazing doctors, all is well. Looks worse with the dressing on than off. I swear! #wearsunscreen." The actor has undergone four treatments following his first since 2013. Last year, he posted a similar photo of him with a bandage over his nose, Local SYR.com reported.

Although the actor has basal cell carcinoma, he continued to take on projects. His latest is "Logan," which is the third installment of the X-Men franchise.

The movie is set to hit theaters this March. He is also set to star in the musical biopic called "The Greatest Showman on Earth," which will be out by the end of 2017.

NDTV reported basal cell carcinoma means a change in the skin, such as having a sore that does not heal. The growth of a bump, which is usually skin-colored, pearly white, or pink, is also an indication of skin cancer. Normally, the bumps appear on the face, ears or neck.

The factors that increase the risk of getting this type of skin cancer is spending a lot of time in the sun or undergoing radiation therapy. People with lighter skin, red or blonde hair and light-colored eyes also have greater risk of getting basal cell carcinoma. More than eight in 10 of  3.3 million Americans are diagnosed with skin cancer each year.

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