17-Year-Old Model Opens Up Why Anorexia Almost Killed Her

By Abbie Kraft, Parent Herald April 20, 08:59 pm
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Teen opened up about anorexia that led her to a five week stay in the hospital
(Photo : Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)

A 17-year-old model opened up about her anorexia that almost cost her to lose her life. Phoebe Combes' anorexia got severe that left her so sick causing her skin to rip out of malnutrition 

Eating disorders are common among teenagers and middle-aged women, according to Telegraph. Anorexia can be subtle but can lead the person to a severe coma if left untreated. An Australian model, Phoebe Combes, shares her battle with anorexia with the hopes of spreading awareness.

Admitting that she is struggling with an eating disorder is one of the toughest challenges, according to Combes. It is important for parents to keenly observe their teens' eating habits and overall wellness.

Combes' eating disorder emerged when she was 14. It was, however, left unnoticed due to the baggy clothes that she wore. Her body started to wither up to a point that her mother cried out of concern after she noticed that Phoebe was too thin.

The teenager eventually collapsed and was taken to the hospital. She had a BMI of 12 (severely underweight) and her skin started to rip due to being malnourished. She stayed in the hospital for five weeks for her treatment. After her recovery, Combes decided to speak up and raise awareness in regards to eating disorders, especially anorexia.

"Admitting to having an eating disorder is extremely hard but beating it early and while you still have freedom will be a lot easier than being forced against your will later," Combes stated during her interview with Daily Mail. "Please if you are struggling out there contact the Butterfly Foundation. Anorexia Nervosa is not who I am, it is something that I went through, something I had to deal with and continue to deal with and be aware of not to go back there."

Combes is encouraging the people who went through anorexia and other eating disorders to speak up and discuss their struggles to raise awareness. Combes also shares that talking about the disorder can lead to healing. 

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