China’s New Two-Child Policy Is Prompting Older Chinese Women To Seek In Vitro Fertilization

By Arvin Matthew, Parent Herald May 31, 09:09 am
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In-vitro fertilization is becoming more and more popular in China these days. Ever since the country implemented its new two-child policy in January, older Chinese women who always dreamt of having a second child have begun rushing to the doctor's office in droves to ask about IVF.

Rise In IVF Procedures

Dr. Liu Jiaen, a private hospital manager in Beijing, shared to CTV News that his clientele increased as much as 20 percent following China's adoption of a two-child policy earlier this year. He said the average age of female patients coming to him for IVF was initially 35 years old. Now, majority of his patients are in their 40s and 50s.

"More and more women are coming to ask to have their second child," Jiaen mused. "They have a very low chance to get pregnant so they are in a hurry. They really want to have a child as soon as possible."

According to China Economic Review, the surge in IVF consultations and procedures in China can be attributed to many Chinese parents who longed for a second child, but were hindered by the country's notorious one-child policy.

China's National Health and Family Planning Commission reported in late 2015 that roughly 90 million Chinese women are eligible to conceive a second child. The country's labor force is expected to add 30 million people by 2050 as a result of the policy change.

Behavioral Aspect

For decades, it has been a popular custom in China for grandparents to raise their grandchildren while their mother and father are busy working. Global Times pointed out that these children often grow up without proper discipline and good behavior as grandparents tend to pamper and spoil their precious little angels.

Apart from addressing the country's glaring population issues, China's new two-child policy has also been set into motion to remedy the so-called "generation of petulance." By giving siblings to spoiled offsprings, firstborns wouldn't be so coddled and overly-indulged by their parents and grandparents.

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