Parenting Facts: Is It Ok For Boys to Cry?

By Abbie Kraft, Parent Herald June 22, 06:23 am

"Stop Crying!" "Boys Shouldn't Cry!" these statements are often blurted by parents the moment their child would begin to sob. 5-9 year old boys that would lose on a soccer game, or would end up with a scrape on the knee would often "suck it in" as they are often told not to cry to be a real man. One of this biggest question is still left unanswered. Are boys allowed to cry?

According to Hannah Rosin of NPR, it is ok for boys to cry, as long as they would shed a tear for the right reason. She mentioned that there's nothing wrong if a boy would cry, especially when it comes to expressing his emotions.

"I think we care a lot less about boys crying than we used to" Rosin wrote. "But more than we will admit. Or to put it another way: boys can cry, if they do it in just the right way."

It was mentioned that boys were raised in a way wherein they were taught that crying is a sign of weakness. Psychology Today however, noted that it is normal for boys to cry. It was even mentioned that it is healthy for them to do so.

Boys who would express vulnerability have higher EQ, given the fact that they can properly express their emotions. In a study on temperament, it was revealed that boys and girls do not have any difference when it comes to temperament. Boys experience the same emotions as girls, such as shyness, anger, sadness and being fearful.

It was then highlighted that young boys are more prone to depressive tendencies and most of them are sadder compared to girls. It is easier for girls to relieve themselves from frustrating emotions as they can be more vulnerable and open when it comes to expressing how they feel. Boys, on the other hand, are referred to as weak and would end up being reprimanded every time they'd cry.

It is important for parents to raise their boys in a way that they would openly express their emotions. It is ok for boys to cry, as long they do it for the right reasons, especially when it comes to expressing their emotions.

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