Childhood Obesity: How To Promote Physical Wellnes Among Kids

By Joshua Williams, Parent Herald November 20, 09:14 pm

Obesity and weight gain in kids are the most alarming issue in the world, especially in the United States. Different solutions and proposals have been formulated to overcome this adverse situation. Child obesity, however, has spread rampantly and has been a growing cause of concern since it leads to a heap of problems both on children and parents.

Schools are homes to children's learning and education, and it includes their overall well-being too. According to Forbes, U.S. surgeons consider obesity in children a major threat and a private organization named AFHK (Action For Healthy Kids) is formed to raise awareness and help promote physical wellness among kids. They believe that actions speak louder than words and it is the right time to take steps toward ending unhealthy lifestyle.

Since its origin, AFHK has worked with over 29,000 schools to meet and assess children health requirements and intends to do more in the coming years. The program helps school authorities in providing healthy school meals for all children.

This campaign is among the most crucial steps that have to be exercised in regulating health in American children. The importance of healthy breakfast and meals along with an array of physical activities is one of the key elements of the program.

AFHK has been working in cooperation with many sponsors, one such company is Cargill, Cargill supports global nutrition and food system regulations. With the help of such companies, healthy solutions to obesity have been introduced in so many schools. Cargill also provides funds for schools to contribute healthy alternative meals for children.

According to CDC, child obesity is one of the biggest health issues in the United States. It is only in the past few years that the levels have turned slightly lower.

Parents cannot spare themselves from helping their children in acquiring healthy habits. They have an unquestionable responsibility on their kids' health and AFHK suggests that parents involvement should be more significant.

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