Marijuana and Mental Health: Cannabinoids Can Possibly Help Those With Bipolar Disorder

By Abbie Kraft, Parent Herald December 31, 10:58 pm
Bipolar Disorder and Marijuana
(Photo : Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

It's already a known fact that marijuana has endless medicinal properties. Not only can in alleviate chronic diseases, but it is reportedly capable of reducing the risk of Alzheimer's and can ease depression. Marijuana is a renowned anti-depressant substitute as it releases happy hormones, but it does, however, vary per individual.

Hello MD explained that marijuana can also be used for bipolar disorder. As per the website, bipolar disorder causes the individual to go through a series of extreme mood swings, which can range from an elevated manic behavior, into an extremely depressive state in a snap.

Similar to depression treatment, cannabinoids present in marijuana are reportedly capable of stabilizing depressive mood swings; this should be however taken in low dose. Though it is not safe to self-medicate, recent studies revealed that marijuana can sometimes have an adverse effect on the individual. It can even make the mood swing more severe since each person responds to pot's effects differently. It is important to seek a specialist first before using medical marijuana for bipolar disorders.

Pot strains that are recommended for bipolar disorder are the sour grape, Kryptonite, and skywalker. Leafy mentioned that a new research that was published in regards to bipolar disorder stated that symptoms of mania and depression may worsen with cannabis use.

"The study, conducted at Lancaster University (UK), analyzed clinically structured diary entries of 24 bipolar patients who consumed cannabis a minimum of three times a week, " as mentioned in the publication.

The researchers were able to come into conclusion that cannabis use was associated with positive emotions, but also with increased manic and depressive symptoms. It was also mentioned that Marijuana use was not associated with self-medicating behavior, meaning subjects tended to use cannabis when feeling good rather than after a manic or depressive episode.

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