Choking Game Kills 13-Year-Old Teenager In Australia

By alexa ancheta, Parent Herald January 06, 07:01 am
Parents urged to warn their children about the dangers of the choking game which could lead to serious health damage or even death.
(Photo : Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Parents were urged to talk to their children and warn them about the fatal effects of playing the choking game. This came after a 13-year-old boy in Brisbane died Friday after playing the game, which is said to bring euphoria as a result of cutting off, albeit temporarily, the supply of oxygen to the brain.

"As it raises its terrible ugly head on the internet it becomes more prevalent and then it wanes away again," Andrew Pierpoint, president of the Secondary Principals' Association, said when he stressed the dangers of the game that have somehow become a fad among teenagers. "I know that parents would be and should be having those conversations around the dinner table," he added.

Even though the victim's parents refused to be named, ABC said they wanted to publicize the incident so that other parents would become aware of this particular activity. The parents of the boy also wanted other parents to be also aware that young people get a variety of influences online and some of it encourage them to take risks that could be dangerous for them and their friends.

In the United States alone, there were already 80 deaths resulting from the choking game. Richard Kidd, chair of the general practice of the Australian Medical Association, said even a few minutes of hypoxia can lead to the death of brain cells. Daily Mail reported that other people who experience this condition have gone into seizures, which signals an uncontrolled activity of the brain.

Carmel Nash, executive director of Federation of Parents and Friends of Catholic Schools in Queensland, said they are already alarmed about the influence brought about by the internet. He said teachers should talk to students about how to resist the pressure of their peers. Parents and guardians were also advised to monitor the online activities of their wards.

The choking game is also known as the game of good boys since no alcohol or drugs are involved, as per News.com.au. However, young people who participate in the challenge are not aware that they can suffer from lasting health damages or even kill themselves in the process. The online craze requires participants to choke themselves or their friends and then post the choking game videos online.

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