The Painful Truth: Helping Your Child Cope With Your Divorce

The Painful Truth: Helping Your Child Cope With Your Divorce

Divorce. It's one of the things in modern society that are perceived with a lot of negativity. Yet, to those who go through it, it is a second chance at life, to leave a commitment that is no longer worth holding on to. After all, nobody should be forced to stay in a relationship that doesn't work, or worse, when that relationship is abusive.

by Hannah Smith

Parents Play a Big Role in Student Education

Parents Play a Big Role in Student Education

Without a doubt, the role of parents in education is now more critical than ever. As you may probably notice, the younger generations are bombarded with so many possible choices. We're experiencing the era of information, a time when every child can get access to whatever information he requires.

by Staff Reporter

Study Shows Pediatricians Can Help Parents to Quit Smoking

Study Shows Pediatricians Can Help Parents to Quit Smoking

BOSTON - An NIH-funded study published in JAMA Pediatrics has shown pediatricians can help parents quit smoking. The research, led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital for Children (MGHfC), was conducted across five states--North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Ohio and Indiana--and delivered a simple, customizable intervention: Upon check-in at their child's appointment, parents took an electronic questionnaire that asked whether any smokers in the household desired to quit and offered them prescriptions for two FDA-approved cessation products -- nicotine patches and gum, as well as enrollment in the state's free quitline and the national SmokefreeTXT program. All smokers in the practice, whether or not they elected to try quitting, also received motivational messages from their child's pediatricians.

by Staff Reporter

A License to Parents?

A License to Parents?

It's a comment we often hear in response to stories of child neglect: that parenting should require a license. Researcher Dr. Frank Ainsworth from James Cook University in Australia says that while the suggestion is based on concern for children, it is fraught with problems.

by Staff Reporter

Motivations for Sexting Can be Complicated, UA Researcher Says

Motivations for Sexting Can be Complicated, UA Researcher Says

Amidst a surge in research and media reports on the potentially negative consequences of "sexting," a University of Arizona researcher is exploring what motivates young people to send sexually explicit images of themselves via text message in the first place.

by Staff Reporter

Older Adults More Likely to Condemn Even Accidental Harm

Older Adults More Likely to Condemn Even Accidental Harm

CHICAGO -- As people get older, they are more likely to condemn and want to punish others for acts that cause harm, even if no harm was intended, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

by Staff Reporter

Psychology can help prevent deadly childhood accidents

Psychology Can Help Prevent Deadly Childhood Accidents

CHICAGO -- Injuries have overtaken infectious disease as the leading cause of death for children worldwide, and psychologists have the research needed to help predict and prevent deadly childhood mishaps, according to a presentation at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

by Staff Reporter

Positive Effect of Music And Dance on Dementia Proven by New Zealand Study

Positive Effect of Music And Dance on Dementia Proven by New Zealand Study

Stereotypically viewed as passive and immobile, a University of Otago, New Zealand, a pilot study has shown the powerful influence music and dance can have on older adults with dementia.

by Staff Reporter

Sports Injuries

How Parents Can Help the 3.5 Million Students Involved in Sports Injuries

Organized sports, both in school and out of school, resulting in 3.5 million students suffering injuries. Around 1 in 10 children, or slightly higher, will suffer from sports-related injuries each year. In a person's childhood, around 33% of injuries will relate to sports.

by Hannah Smith

Are Trampoline Parks Safe for Children?

Are Trampoline Parks Safe for Children?

Trampoline parks have exploded in popularity in recent years. On any given weekend, these parks are at full capacity, with hundreds of kids bouncing around, jumping into foam pits and playing tag.

by Hannah Smith

Why Even the Best Parents Can’t Monitor Their Kids’ Social Media on Their Own

Why Even the Best Parents Can't Monitor Their Kids' Social Media on Their Own

Every day, in my job on the data breach response team at ID Experts®, I encounter scores of people whose lives, finances, records and sense of security have been devastated by identity theft. We live in a scary time, when our most personal information can be bought and sold online for the cost of a sandwich.

by By Denyl Green

Games for Health Journal (IMAGE)

Can Videogames Promote Emotional Intelligence in Teenagers?

A new study has shown that videogames, when used as part of an emotional intelligence training program, can help teenagers evaluate, express, and manage their own emotions immediately after the training. The study design, interpretation of results, and implications of these findings are published in Games for Health Journal, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. publishers. Click here to read the full-text article free on the Games for Health Journal website through August 15, 2019.

by Staff Reporter

Bedroom Makeover

5 Cool Bedroom Makeover Ideas

The time has come for a fantastic bedroom makeover, but you are out of ideas. A great way to find out what to do next is to grab a cup of coffee, lay back, and read ahead!

by Hannah Smith

Preclinical BPD (IMAGE)

Scientists Developing Way to Help Premature Babies Breathe Easier

Researchers suggest a possible cell-based therapy to stimulate lung development in fragile premature infants who suffer from a rare condition called Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia (BPD), which in the most severe cases can lead to lifelong breathing problems and even death.

by Staff Reporter

Family Doctor (IMAGE)

Study Investigates Role of Family Doctors in Advanced Therapies

A recent study conducted jointly by the Tissue Engineering Research Group of the Department of Histology and the Family Medicine Unit of the University of Granada (UGR) has highlighted the conceptual, attitudinal, and procedural profile of resident hospital doctors specialising in Family Medicine, in relation to the so-called advanced therapies.

by Staff Reporter

Katarina Patriksson (IMAGE)

Language Barriers Effect Parents' Participation in Neonatal Care

A warm smile and a caring hand on the shoulder are not enough to overcome the language barriers that can arise between parents and healthcare professionals in neonatal care in Sweden when the parents have not mastered the Swedish language. A new thesis raises the questions of when and how to get the assistance of an interpreter.

by Staff Reporter

Baby's Sexual Orientation

Many Parents Struggle for Years to Adjust After Learning a Child's Sexual Orientation

Two years after their child "comes out" as lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB), many parents still say that it is moderately or very hard for them to adjust to the news, according to a study published today. Those responses are the same, on average, as parents who have recently learned about their child's sexual orientation, a finding that suggests most parents struggle with such news for several years.

by Staff Reporter

Geoffrey Brown, University of Georgia (IMAGE)

How Fathers, Children Should Spend Time Together

As men everywhere brace for an onslaught of ties, tools, wallets and novelty socks gifted for Father's Day, here are two questions fathers of young children should ask themselves: What activities are best for bonding with my child, and when should those activities take place?

by Staff Reporter

Visiting Pharmacy

Weekly Pharmacy Visits Boost Drug Adherence and Quality of Life in Heart Failure Patients

Athens, Greece - 26 May 2019: Elderly patients with heart failure who see a pharmacist once a week are more likely to take their tablets and be active in daily life, according to late-breaking results from the PHARM-CHF randomized controlled trial presented today at Heart Failure 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1

by Staff Reporter

Twin Babies (IMAGE)

Support Needed for Multiple-Birth Families to Improve Outcomes

Having multiple-birth babies can be a time of wonder and excitement, however, according to the first-ever international collaborative report released today, these babies and their families can face serious disadvantages compared to parents of single-birth babies.

by Staff Reporter

Manuel Jimenez (IMAGE)

Reading with Toddlers Reduces Harsh Parenting, Enhances Child Behavior

People who regularly read with their toddlers are less likely to engage in harsh parenting and the children are less likely to be hyperactive or disruptive, a Rutgers-led study finds.

by Staff Reporter

Street Smarts: Bike Safety Strategies for Kids (IMAGE)

Nearly 1 in 5 Parents say their Child Never Wears a Helmet While Riding a Bike

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- Despite evidence that helmets are critical to preventing head injuries, not all children wear them while biking, skateboarding, and riding scooters, a new national poll finds.

by Staff Reporter

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