Here Are Some Tips To Make Sure Your Kids Are Safe This Summer Swimming Season

By Tanya Diente, Parent Herald May 28, 08:02 am
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Safety should always come first when indulging a child to swim in the pool or on the beach. Young children should have adult supervision and any swimmer, regardless of age, should always have a swimming buddy.
(Photo : CDC | Twitter)

The summer months mean fun times spent on the beach or in the pool. For parents, this is when they should be on guard for accidental drowning.

Below are tips to ensure children's safety this summer swimming season.

Safety First

Nothing can be more relaxing and enjoyable than spending time on the beach or in the pool with family. This is a special time for parents to bond with their children.

However, this does not mean that they should let their guard down for any untoward incidents on water. On the contrary, parents need to be extra mindful of their kids when they are having too much fun since it could lead to accidental drowning.

Safety should come first when it comes to swimming, so parents should take note of numerous tips before they let their kids hit the water. Carol Barnett, swim head at Shibley Day Camp in Nassau County, emphasized the importance of knowing the child's ability to swim, which is not dependent on the kid's age or size.

Parents should be confident of their kids' ability to swim. This is why it is also important that children learn how to swim at an early age. Barnett also advised a swimming buddy, as no one, regardless of age, should swim alone in case of incidents.

"[Children] should always swim with a buddy. Also, they should be taught what to do if an emergency occurs," Barnett tells Popsugar.

Adult Supervision At All Times

It is also imperative that young children must have adult supervision and that the designated adult remains undistracted or not engaged in any other activity. Kids should never be left unattended even for a second to avoid accidental drowning.

The adult should always maintain "touch supervision swimming," which means he or she can assist the child at any moment when needed.

It is also important that adults learn to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation or CPR. Knowing how to administer the emergency procedure can save a life.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that drowning is the leading cause of deaths for infants and children between the ages of 1 and 4 years old. According to the health institute's records, 70 percent of drowning cases in pre-schoolers happen in the care of one or both parents at the time of the incident. Meanwhile, 75 percent go missing for five minutes or less.

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