How to Prevent Babies from Acquiring Whooping Cough

Whooping cough is most common to adults and adolescents. It is said that the disease has been eliminated years ago but the truth is it still exists especially to those who are not vaccinated.

Whooping cough or pertussis is a respiratory tract infection which is highly contagious. It is known for its hacking cough followed by a high-pitched inhalation that makes a "whoop" sound.

Babies who are too young for the pertussis vaccine or their vaccine in incomplete, they are more likely to acquire whooping cough and are susceptible to severe complications, according to Times Leader.

Infants who have pertussis can have severe trouble in breathing and develop pneumonia. In rare cases, babies may suffer brain damage or even death. They are so vulnerable to disease because they cannot receive a vaccine until they are two months old.

Baby's immunization is a series of four injections that will start at the age of two months, another shot at four months old, third vaccine at six months old the final vaccine is when the baby is 15-18 months old. The third dose of vaccine to prevent pertussis is at six months old and until then; the baby is vulnerable to the illness.

There are ways, however, to prevent a baby in acquiring pertussis, according to CDC:

  •  Pregnant should get vaccinated with the pertussis vaccine on the third trimester of the pregnancy. She should talk to their doctor or midwife about Tdap shot to help protect the baby and herself.
  •  Everyone that surrounding the baby should have an up-to-date whopping cough vaccine, especially the caregivers. Anyone who is not updated with the vaccine should get vaccinated two weeks before coming in contact with the baby.
  •  Know the signs of whooping cough. It starts like a common cold with runny nose or congestion and sneezing. There will be a mild cough or fever. Severe cough follows after one or two weeks.
  •  It is important to know that many babies with whooping cough do not cough at all instead it may cause them to stop breathing.

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