Pregnancy: Protein That May Advance Treatments For Miscarriage And Pre-eclampsia Identified

A protein that is part of the development of the placenta that may help improve treatments for repeated miscarriages and preeclampsia. The protein, called Syncytin-1, helps embryos implant themselves in the mother's womb.

Syncytin-1 was the product of a viral infection of primates 25 million years ago, Science Daily reported. The protein is produced on the surface of a developing embryo before it implants itself in the mother's womb.

Protein Seen To Help Promote Healthier Pregnancy

The development of the embryo in its early stages is necessary to improve the treatments for pregnancy complications, said The Hindu. Based on the study's results, scientists are hoping to develop blood tests to determine which pregnancies are at risk for complications and to create proper therapies.

"It will be necessary to see if embryos from women who suffer from conditions such as recurrent miscarriage have unusual syncytin production," biologist Harry Moore said, as per The Hindu. Moore is from the University of Sheffield, United Kingdom.

According to New Scientist, the researchers analyzed 20 human embryos that were donated by women who were undertaking in vitro fertilization. The embryos were grown for up to five days until they became blastocysts or parcels of about 100 cells.

Protein Produced Within Five Days Of Fertilization

According to New Scientist, the researchers analyzed 20 human embryos that were donated by women who were undertaking in vitro fertilization. The embryos were grown for up to five days until they became blastocysts or parcels of about 100 cells.

They then coated the blastocysts with antibodies that create Syncytin-1 fluoresce. The cells around the outside of the embryo reportedly began producing Syncytin-1 between four to five days after they were fertilized.

Syncytin-1 triggers enzymes that break down the lining of the uterus. This permits the blastocyst to be implanted. It is then when the placenta develops.

What do you think about a viral infection turning out to be helpful in pregnancies? Write your comments below.

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