Autism News: Studies Reveal That Ultrasound Can Possibly Heighten The Severity Of Autism Among Male Children

By Abbie Kraft, Parent Herald October 19, 12:47 pm
Tamara Nicolle holds a black and white ultrasound image of her baby in her kitchen February 4, 2003 in Savannah, Georgia.
(Photo : Stephen Morton/Getty Images)

Recent studies reveal that ultrasound exposure during pregnancy can possibly heighten the severity of autism. The studies suggest that male patients diagnosed with the condition before birth can possibly suffer from the consequence of the severity of the condition due to first-trimester diagnostic ultrasound exposure.

A group of researchers released a study, which focuses on the variability of the symptoms of autism. Researchers came up with a finding that suggests first-trimester diagnostic ultrasounds can affect the severity of autism. It was mentioned that ultrasounds can possibly be associated with heightened autistic conditions among males who are already genetically diagnosed according to WOL.

The cause of autism is yet to be discovered but there are several variables that can be considered as factors that trigger the severity of the condition. Researchers at UW Medicine, UW Bothell and Seattle Children's Research Institute stated that their study is not focused on the cure for autism but the secondary factors that heightened the condition. Dr. Sara Webb, the lead author of the study stated that their study is aimed towards the factors that possibly trigger the rise and decline of their IQ levels. 

"This study really looks at the second question," Webb said. "Within kids with autism, what are some of the factors that may result in a child having a good outcome or higher IQ or better language or less severity versus a child who maybe takes more of a hit and continues to struggle throughout their lifespan?"

Their research, which involves 2,644 families in the United States came into conclusion that male children who are diagnosed with autism and were exposed to ultrasound during the first trimester of their mother's pregnancy showcased lower verbal IQ and heightened repetitive behavior. The study, however, was only focused on male participants as no significant findings were discovered for the female counterparts as mentioned in Science Daily.

Webb then added that further research needs to be done in lieu of the study. She then added that positive benefits can be reaped from ultrasound, but there are given procedures that possess negative risks.

"If we can figure out this information in any other way, I would go with that," Webb stated. "It's always worth considering that when we do medical procedures, there are great benefits but also risk."

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