Research Reveals Amino Acid Can Help Curb Alcohol Addiction And Alleviate Hangovers

By Abbie Kraft, Parent Herald January 09, 09:04 pm
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Research reveal that one of the best ways to curb alcohol craving is to increase the levels of amino acid that the person takes.
(Photo : Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

Alcohol abuse often leads to health complications thus, some would have to have their condition treated as early as possible. Research reveals that one of the best ways to curb alcohol craving is to increase the levels of amino acid that the person takes.

Known as the building blocks of protein, it was mentioned that amino acid can effectively reduce a person's alcohol craving and intoxication. According to Psychology Today, a person who regularly consumes alcohol and those who suffer from alcohol intoxication lack amino acids in their system.

Alcoholics do not have adequate amino acid consumption in their bodies due to malnutrition and malabsorption caused by the presence of alcohol. In a research done in regards to amino acids and its capability to help alcohol addiction and withdrawal, it was cited that the building blocks of protein help the individual manage alcohol craving, intoxication and even during withdrawal.

Moreover, researchers were able to discover that alcohol consumption often increases the levels of a toxic metabolite known as acetaldehyde, which alters the individual's cognitive function that can highly affect the mental capacity of the individual. But experts found the amino acids lower the presence of acetaldehyde, thus helping the brain recover.

The study involved 60 individuals that were hospitalized due to acute alcohol withdrawal. It was revealed that some were given 1 gram of taurine supplement three times a day for a week while others were given a placebo.

As a result of the study, the ones who received the taurine supplement have fewer withdrawal symptoms. It was then noted that there's a significant impact on those who took the taurine as they have fewer delirium and hallucinations compared to the later.

"Brain cells send signals to one another using a variety of chemicals called neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine," Dr. Hyla Cass stated during an interview with Recovery View. "A neurotransmitter emitted by one cell is picked up by specialized receptors on neighboring cells. Alcohol and mood-altering drugs (prescription or illegal) work by either mimicking the action of neurotransmitters or artificially stimulating or repressing them."

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