'Peppa Pig' Linked To Autism: Children's Show Is Said To Be Harmful For Children

By Abbie Kraft, Parent Herald October 23, 07:03 am
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Popular kids TV show "Peppa Pig" faced several backlashes as health care experts and researchers warn parents of its negative impact on kids. A Harvard surfaced that exposure to the said TV show can possibly lead children into developing autism.

Peppa Pig along with her brother, George may be two of the well-loved characters among toddlers. Though it may seem like a harmless children's cartoon, a researcher suggests that "Peppa Pig" can possible cause autism among its viewers. In 2012, epidemiologist Marc Wildemberg from the Harvard University stated that "Peppa Pig" can possibly cause autism.

Wildemberg claims that children who spend at least half an hour watching "Peppa Pig" are bring placed at risk of developing autism by 56 percent according to Morning News USA. Though the study was done four years back, it resurfaced after "Peppa Pig" made the deadlines on its negative impact on kids.

"Children exposed to at least 30 minutes a day of the show have a 56% higher probability of developing autism, Wildemberg claims."

It may seem believable, but the research claiming that "Peppa Pig" can trigger autism was eventually slammed due to lack evidence in regards to the study. It was also mentioned that the study with no factual evidence was possibly done to discredit "Peppa Pig."

"Peppa Pig" managed to make rounds on countless media outlets as it is said to cause a negative impact on young viewers due to her rowdy attitude. Parent Herald reported that "Peppa Pig," highly influence children's behavior as they would re-enact her bratty attitude.

Parents complain that their children copy Peppa's annoying behavior - behaving like a brat, burping and blowing raspberries all the time, and saying 'I don't want to play with you anymore' to their friends (just like Peppa does). That and they start jumping in muddy puddles all the time!"

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