Ice Pops After Childbirth Is The Super Vaginal Pain Relief New Moms Were Never Told About

By Amanda Moore, Parent Herald April 13, 04:00 am
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New moms seeking a super vaginal pain relief after childbirth might have not yet heard of the ice pops trick. Martin Wanless, an Australian dad, shares a valuable tip on how to prepare this using a few simple things: condoms and water.

Wanless learned about ice pops when his own wife gave birth naturally. He recounted how a condom filled with frozen water helped his wife's pain and swelling in her nether regions, after pushing a baby out of her vagina.

"Shortly after giving birth in a hospital, my wife was taken to a fridge full of frozen condoms," Wanless wrote in his advice on DAD. He suggested fathers expecting a baby soon to start stocking up on condoms to use as super vaginal pain relief for their wife later.

Just to be clear, however, the ice pops need not be inserted where the baby just came out, Cafe Mom cited. The ice pops should only rest between the legs of the mom. "The frozen gloriousness of that little popsicle in your undies is heaven; it stops the burning pain," one mom said in a Facebook discussion about after childbirth relief.

Ice pops work the same way as homemade padsicles or sanitary pads with aloe vera and witch hazel for vaginal pain relief. After dabbing at least two tablespoons of the aloe vera and witch hazel on the pad, place this in a freezer bag and use this after giving birth. Tall Mom Tiny shared a step-by-step DIY guide for padsicles.

Ice pops or padsicles, however, are not meant to replace medical treatments so it's still best to ask the doctor about vaginal pain relief after a natural childbirth. Obstetrician and gynecologist Shazia Malik said icepops "can be very comforting for pain and swelling around the perineum," as per Metro.

She, however, said ice might burn or damage the skin if it's too cold, so take extra measures before using this. She also doesn't suggest wrapping the ice pops in tissue or leaving it open as there could be infection risks.

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