Toy Safety: Moose Toys Recall Frogs Due To Safety Issues

By alexa ancheta, Parent Herald February 28, 04:00 am

Moose Toys Ltd., a company that develops, designs and distributes toys for children in more than 80 countries, has recalled more than 400,000 of its Little Live Pets Lil Frog toys due to safety reasons. Up to 17,000 plastic frog toys being sold in Canada are also included in the recall.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) in the United States reported that a defect in the battery design of the Moose Toys plastic frogs can possibly cause chemical hazards for handlers. The company recalled the plastic toy frogs as a precautionary measure. The toys included in the recall were sold between August to February at Toys R' Us, Amazon, Walmart, Target and military exchanges.

"If the batteries cap is removed it can become a projectile and the chemicals can leak posing chemicals and injury hazards," Moose Toys announced.

Only the Lil Frog Lily Pad and Little Live Pets Lil Frog from Moose toys with the colors green, blue and pink are included in the recall, according to CNN. To determine if the products are included in the recall, consumers are advised to look for the WS112016 and WS123216 manufacture date codes. These codes can be found beneath the product SKU located at the lower belly of the toy frog.

Moose Toys has received 17 reports of injuries related to the toy frog's batteries including chemical leaks. Two of these injuries led to eye irritation that required a visit to the doctor and the emergency room.

The company is closely coordinating with the CPSC and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission to implement the recall, as per ABC2 News. It has established a process for the recall and the replacement of the product for free.

The recall only applies to the two specific toy frog products and does not include other toys under the Little Live Pets brand, according to Moose Toys. Consumers are asked to immediately stop using the products and contact the company at 1-844-575-0340 or through their website.

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