A Special Kind Of Santa Is All Over America's Mall For Kids With Autism This Christmas

By Loisse Malfoy, Parent Herald December 14, 05:50 pm
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The organization, Autism Speaks, has a new project that helps kids with autism experience Christmas with the traditional hanging out with Santa Claus in malls. They are currently working with all the malls in the United States to make this happen.

Autism Speaks is aware of the tradition that involves parents taking their kids to the mall to sit on Santa Claus' lap and request for a gift. According to NBC, not all kids get to appreciate that because they have the case of autism. Most of them are not fond of the music and the lights that go on in the mall, as it has an annoying and distracting effect in their mind and body. Instead of enjoying Santa's presence, kids with autism would get all anxious and could even breakdown.

A photo posted by scubyshan (@scubyshan) on Dec 12, 2016 at 5:07pm PST

This is why Autism Speaks thought it was a very good idea to give these kids a special kind of Santa that would help with their autism and anxiety while they are at the mall. Journal News featured one of the establishments which are working with the organization, and it is called the Liberty Center in Ohio. This is not an ordinary hang out with Santa because this is designed specifically for kids with autism.

The session last for two hours only for those children who are experiencing sensory processing disorder. These kids won't have to deal with brilliant lights and loud holiday music. In fact, there will be no music and the lights are all dim. Through this, kids with autism would experience sitting on Santa's lap without having to meltdown after.

It is a good initiative to make special children experience this kind of moment like healthy kids. If you know anyone who has kids with autism and wants to hang out with Santa Claus this Christmas, tell them to go to their nearest mall and check out the sensory Santa visit program.

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